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Craving of Online Gambling

Online Gambling

Internet has brought gambling into homes, and has made it available to everyone and everywhere in the world. The first actual online casino was formed in 1995, and now there are above 500 gambling websites on internet. In 1997, $200 million were earned by this business. Online gambling makes at least $3 billion of annual revenue. bandarq

Gamblers log on to the website and deposit funds by using credit cards, certified cheques, money orders, or through wire transfers. If they win/loose the amount is automatically credited/deducted from their accounts.

Addiction

As online gambling has gained popularity, it also gave birth to the gambling addiction. Now days, gambling addiction is the main concern that comes in the context of online gambling. It is a fact that legalized online gambling sites are the major source of online gambling. In traditional casinos gamblers use real chips or money, while online gamblers bets on a click of mouse instead of any tangible money.
Video gambling is more popular as compared to other forms of online gambling because of its faster feedback. Sociologist and psychiatrists refers it as ‘crack-cocaine of gambling addiction’.

Restrictions for Minors

The reason behind the popularity of online gambling is that it is easily and quickly accessible by everyone. The advantage of online gambling is the unlimited time, where as traditional gambling has limited hours of operation. It is suggested that gamblers who have lost an incredible amount of money are more likely to keep betting on their computers than if they were sitting at a table with others watching. With unlimited potential for minors to access these online gambling sites, opponents of this industry argue that the only way to keep children away is to prohibit these sites to everyone.

Fraud

The instinctive nature of online gambling gives birth to various frauds. Online gamblers have no idea whether the game in going on fairly or not? The most common type of fraud is the abuse of credit card information and the neglect to pay out the winning amount to the winners, who can never approach them.

Prohibition

Canadian Law, section 207(4) (c), prohibits lottery schemes operated on or through a computer, video device or slot machine if it is not conducted and managed by a provincial government. This law clearly says that online gambling and its addiction is totally illegal. At this time, Canada should enact new legislations to address online gambling addiction, while, American government is creating legislation to completely ban online gambling. The most important bill is the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act (IGPA).

Online gambling has become a massive business on the internet and this explosive business will definitely be added with new technology and advancement in the near future. There are various problems associated with this gambling like addiction, bankruptcy, availability to minors, fraud and other crimes, and loss of revenues through fraudulent activities. Currently, there are no measures to stop this business, but governments all over the world should take some action against online gambling because it is promoting new crimes and frauds and it is also affecting the children, adversely.

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Seafood sales online total informational in 2020

The seafood sales online fishery opened on March 14 amid little fanfare and flattened markets.

The first fish of the eight-month season typically attracts the seafood sales online and is rushed fresh to high-end buyers, especially during the Lenten season. But that’s not the case in this time of corona virus chaos when air traffic is stalled and seafood sales online of all kinds is backlogged in global freezers.

Alaska’s share of the 2020 seafood sales online catch is about 17 million pounds for nearly 2,000 fishermen who own shares of the popular flatfish. A week into the fishery, fewer than 50 landings were made, totaling just over 262,000 pounds, and as anticipated, prices to fishermen were in the pits.

Earliest price reports at Homer were posted at $4.20 to $4.40 per pound, Kodiak prices were at $3.25 for 10- to 20-pounders, $3.50 for seafood sales online

weighing 20 to 40 pounds, and $4 for “forty ups.” Prices ranged from $3.75 to $4 at Yakutat and $3.50 “across the board” at Wrangell, according to Alaska Boats and Permits in Homer.

The seafood sales online of $5, $4.75, and $4.50 were reported at Southeast ports that have regular air freight service, although they are expected to drop by $1 to $2 per pound, a major buyer said.

The average statewide price for Alaska halibut in 2019 was $5.30 a pound and $5.35 in 2018.

For this season’s start, some Alaska processors were buying small lots of halibut on consignment or filling existing orders; others were not buying at all.

“We are tentatively going to be buying longline fish on the first of May after the Columbia ferry gets back seafood sales online,” said a major buyer in Southeast who blamed not having traditional ferries that haul thousands of pounds of fish each week, and a lack of air freight options at smaller communities.

“We’re down here where transportation is dictating where fish has to go,” he added.

Most of Alaska’s seafood sales online goes into the U.S. market, where in recent years it has faced stiff competition from up to 8 million pounds of fresh Atlantic halibut, primarily from eastern Canada. And although Russia has banned purchases of U.S. seafood since 2014, increasing amounts of halibut caught by Russian fishing fleets are coming into our nation. Trade data show that 2 million pounds of Pacific and seafood sales online were imported to the U.S. over the past year through January 2020, valued at nearly $6.7 million.

A major Alaska buyer said: “One of our salespeople shot us a deal showing that right now you can buy frozen at sea, tail off, 3-5 and 5-8 pound seafood sales online from Russia for $3.25 a pound.”

Also newly appearing on U.S. shelves: farmed halibut fillets from Norway retailing at $9.99 a pound.

Hatchery hauls – Alaska salmon that got their start in hatcheries made up 25 percent of last year’s total statewide catch.

In 2019, roughly 50 million hatchery salmon, mostly pinks and chums, were caught by Alaska fishermen, valued at $118 million, or 18% of the state’s total salmon harvest value.

That’s according to the seafood sales online by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

Currently, there are 30 hatcheries producing salmon in Alaska, of which 26 are operated by private nonprofits. Fish and Game operates two sportfish hatcheries, in Anchorage and Fairbanks, the federal government runs a research hatchery near Sitka, and the Metlakatla tribe also operates a hatchery.